Exercise interventions for cognitive function in adults older than 50: a systematic review with meta-analysis | British Journal of Sports Medicine

When exercise prescription was examined, a duration of 45–60 min per session and at least moderate intensity, were associated with benefits to cognition. The results of the meta-analysis were consistent and independent of the cognitive domain tested or the cognitive status of the participants.Conclusions Physical exercise improved cognitive function in the over 50s, regardless of the cognitive status of participants. To improve cognitive function, this meta-analysis provides clinicians with evidence to recommend that patients obtain both aerobic and resistance exercise of at least moderate intensity on as many days of the week as feasible, in line with current exercise guidelines.

Source: Exercise interventions for cognitive function in adults older than 50: a systematic review with meta-analysis | British Journal of Sports Medicine

Loss of Neck Curve Speeds Arthritis

Abnormal Cervical Spine Curvatures May Increase Loads on Your Spine by 6-10 Times; Accelerating the Development of Spinal Arthritis and Disc Disease

Source: http://cbpnonprofit.com/2016/05/17/abnormal-cervical-spine-curvatures-may-increase-loads-on-your-spine-by-6-10-times-accelerating-the-development-of-spinal-arthritis-and-disc-disease/

No Excuse Not to Exercise, Run In the Water

diet-for-love-handles If you can stand up or walk, or move your arm, or breath, you are a candidate for an exercise program.  I believe that anyone can exercise.  In my 12 years of patient care I have never heard an acceptable excuse.  Don’t tell me you are too tired.  I don’t want to hear about how it hurts.  Whatever your problem save it.  (Cue little violins…)

You can exercise.  If you can contract any muscle, you can exercise.  If you are bed ridden and can only move your eyes, you can exercise.  You see, exercise is simply taking the function that you do have and using it.  Then pushing the limits to improve that function.

If it is painful for you to walk because you have been carrying a lot of extra weight.  There’s good news…fat floats.  You can walk in a pool. 

A nice little study came out this week about exercise.  Researchers studied fifty-seven physically inactive, overweight, and obese men with an average age of 44.  These guys were randomly assigned to exercise three times per week for 12 weeks on either a treadmill or in a pool.  Body composition was measured and there was absolutely no difference between the two groups.

So throw off the excuses and move your body.

You may also like to read:

Source: Comparative Efficacy of Water and Land Treadmill

Dr. Craig Anderson
craigandersondc.com

Exercise Helps Make Insulin

Our bodies were made to move. Here is another story about the benefits of exercise, this time with sugar regulation, the great thing is the effects were seen after one week. Diabetics (or those who are on their way) have take note. – Dr. A

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Sedentary older people at risk of developing diabetes showed significant improvement in the function of their insulin-making beta cells after just one week of exercise, University of Michigan researchers found.

Beta cell function is known to decline with age, although it is not clear why, Drs. Cathie J. Bloem and Annette M. Chang explain in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

As people age, they may also become less sensitive to the blood sugar-regulating effects of insulin and develop impaired insulin secretion, the researchers add. And while short-term exercise boosts insulin sensitivity, it has not been clear how it might affect beta cell function.

To investigate, Bloem and Chang had 12 sedentary individuals aged 60 and older perform an hour-long workout every day for a week. The exercise sessions, consisting of stints on a treadmill, exercise bike and cross-training machine, required study participants to work out at 60 percent to 70 percent of their maximum heart rate capacity.

After the exercise period, study participants’ sensitivity to insulin had increased by 53 percent, on average, while a measure of beta cell function called the disposition index had risen by 28 percent. However there were no changes in their fat mass, levels of fat in the blood, or other factors that might explain the effect of exercise on beta cells.

“Longer-term exercise training studies are required and are currently in progress to evaluate further exercise training effects on beta cell function in age-related glucose intolerance,” the researchers note.

SOURCE: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, February 2008.

Dr. Craig Anderson
craigandersondc.com