Vitamin D Levels and Sleep Disturbance in Hemodialysis Patients

Vitamin D Levels and Sleep Disturbance in Hemodialysis Patients

Probably the most important part of healthy living is getting good sleep.  Without it we will get diseases of all sorts. -Dr. A

Sleep disturbance is a frequent and serious complication of hemodialysis (HD). Low serum vitamin D levels have been associated with sleep quality in non-HD subjects. Our aim was to examine the possible association between serum vitamin D levels and the presence of sleep disturbance in HD patients. We recruited 141 HD patients at the HD center of the First Affiliated Hospital of Jiaxing University during 2014–2015. Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) were determined by the competitive protein-binding assay. Sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were recorded. Meanwhile, 117 healthy control subjects were also recruited and underwent measurement of 25(OH)D. Eighty-eight patients (62.4%) had sleep disturbance (PSQI scores ≥ 5). Patients with sleep disturbance showed lower levels of 25(OH)D as compared to those without sleep disturbance (85.6 ± 37.4 vs. 39.1 ± 29.1 nmol/L, p < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, serum levels of 25(OH)D (≤48.0 nmol/L) were independently associated with sleep disturbance in HD patients (OR 9.897, 95% CI 3.356–29.187, p < 0.001) after adjustment for possible variables. Our study demonstrates that low serum levels of vitamin D are independently associated with sleep disturbance in HD patients, but the finding needs to be confirmed in future experimental and clinical studies.

Source: Nutrients | Free Full-Text | Association between Serum Vitamin D Levels and Sleep Disturbance in Hemodialysis Patients

Poor Sleep Is Bad for Your Waistline

Poor Sleep Is Bad for Your Waistline

If you think you’re getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis, you’re either fooling yourself or in an extremely small minority.

That’s because increasingly, people are tossing and turning, waking up repeatedly, going to bed late and waking up early, or just plain waking up feeling tired, unrefreshed and unready to take on the next day because of a poor night’s sleep.There are short- and long-term consequences of poor sleep, ranging from irritability and concentration lapses (short term) to cardiovascular disease (long term), but your weight and waistline also may suffer, according to research published in PLoS One, the peer-reviewed journal of the Public Library of Science. In a recent study, adults were divided into three groups based on their average sleep duration: less than six hours nightly (5.88 hours), more than seven hours (7.26 hours), and more than eight hours (8.44 hours). If you got the most average sleep per night, your body-mass index (BMI) was about two points lower than if you got the least average sleep per night. Getting the most sleep, compared to the least, also corresponded with 1.6 inch smaller waistline, on average, compared to getting the least sleep.

Source: Poor Sleep Is Bad for Your Waistline

MRI Study Examines the Rate of Disc Fluid Loss Over an 8 Hour Day

MRI Study Examines the Rate of Disc Fluid Loss Over an 8 Hour Day

Analysis of all 19 disc scans indicated an average gain of 10.6 % in disc volume overnight, as measured prior to activity in the morning. There was a clear and substantial decrease in this disc volume after the subjects walked during the day, but even after 8 hours of continuous walking (with breaks only for scans), the amount of volume (of fluid) remained higher than the volume that had been measured the previous night, prior to sleeping. This indicates the discs’ ability to retain fluids over an extended

Source: MRI Study Examines the Rate of Disc Fluid Loss Over an 8 Hour Day

New Sleep Recommendations for Adults

Nearly 40% of Americans sleep fewer than six hours or more than eight hours per night, on average. Both of these sleep habits—too little sleep and too much sleep—may have negative consequences.
A study released earlier this year found that adults who sleep five to six hours per night are 20% more likely to be overweight compared with those who sleep seven to eight hours. The short sleepers were also 57% more likely to be obese.

Source: https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/sleep-disorders/new-sleep-recommendations-for-adults?cid=t11_flip&cb=ap

Interrupted sleep worse for mood than shortened sleep

Waking up several times throughout the night may be worse for your mood than sleeping a shortened amount of time, found a small study from Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Source: Interrupted sleep worse for mood than shortened sleep, study finds | Fox News